Apr
14
Wed
The Politics of Epidemics @ Zoom
Apr 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us April 14 for “The Politics of Epidemics”, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: Eileen Hunt Botting, Professor, University of Notre Dame

Topic: “The Politics of Epidemics, from Thucydides to Mary Shelley to COVID-19”

When: April 14, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required by guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About Eileen Hunt Botting:

Eileen Hunt Botting (Photo by Peter Ringenberg/University of Notre Dame)

Eileen Hunt Botting is a political theorist whose scholarly interests cover modern political thought, feminism, the family, rights, ethics of technology, and philosophy and literature. She has taught at Notre Dame since 2001. Her books are ‘Family Feuds: Wollstonecraft, Burke, and Rousseau on the Transformation of the Family’ (SUNY, 2006); ‘Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women’s Human Rights’ (Yale, 2016); ‘Mary Shelley and the Rights of the Child: Political Philosophy in “Frankenstein”‘ (Penn Press, 2017); and ‘Artificial Life After Frankenstein’ (Penn Press, 2020). She is also an editor of several academic volumes and scholarly editions: ‘Feminist Interpretations of Alexis de Tocqueville’ (co-edited with Jill Locke for Penn State’s Feminist Interpretations series, 2009); ‘Reminiscences and Traditions of Boston’ by Hannah Mather Crocker (an annotated edition of the c. 1822-29 manuscript, co-edited with Sarah L. Houser for NEHGS, 2011); ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’ by Mary Wollstonecraft (a teaching edition of the 1792 book, with new scholarly commentaries and timelines, for Yale’s Rethinking the Canon series, 2014); ‘The Wollstonecraftian Mind’ (38 chapters from an international team of contributors, co-edited with Sandrine Bergès and Alan Coffee for Routledge’s Philosophical Minds series, 2019); and the two-volume reference set ‘Portraits of Wollstonecraft’ (with 31 annotated illustrations, for Bloomsbury Philosophy, 2021). She has received grants and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies (2015-16), the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (2019), and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Public Understanding of Science, Technology & Economics Program (2019-20) to support her writing. Her essays, political analyses, and opinion pieces have appeared in Aeon Magazine, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Chicago Tribune, Public Seminar, and The TLS.

Apr
27
Tue
US-Europe Relations in the Context of Brexit @ Zoom
Apr 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us April 27 for “US-Europe Relations in the Context of Brexit”, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: Thomas Wright, Brookings Institution

Topic: “US-Europe Relations in the Context of Brexit”

When: April 27, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required by guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About Thomas Wright:

Thomas Wright is the director of the Center on the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution. He is also a contributing writer for The Atlantic and a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy. He is the author of “All Measures Short of War: The Contest For the 21st Century and the Future of American Power” which was published by Yale University Press in May 2017. His second book, “Aftershocks: Pandemic Politics and the End of the Old International Order,” will be published by St Martin’s Press in 2021. Wright also works on U.S. foreign policy, great power competition, the European Union, Brexit, and economic interdependence.

Wright has a doctorate from Georgetown University, a Master of Philosophy from Cambridge University, and a bachelor’s and master’s from University College Dublin. He has also held a pre-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and a post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton University. He was previously executive director of studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and a lecturer at the University of Chicago’s Harris School for Public Policy.

May
13
Thu
The Irish Revolution 1919-1921 in a Global Context @ Zoom
May 13 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us Thursday, May 13 for “The Irish Revolution 1919-1921 in a Global Context”, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: Fearghal McGarry, Queens University Belfast & Boston College

Topic: “The Irish Revolution 1919-1921 in a Global Context”

When: May 13, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required by guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About Fearghal McGarry:

Fearghal McGarry, Professor of Modern Irish History at Queen’s University Belfast, is the spring 2021 Burns Scholar. A member of the Royal Irish Academy, he has written or edited eleven volumes on Irish history. His recent research focuses on the Irish revolution and the cultural and political revival from which it emerged. His publications include The Rising (2010) and The Abbey Rebels of 1916: A Lost Revolution (2015). Earlier work, including studies of Ireland and the Spanish Civil War and biographies of Frank Ryan and Eoin O’Duffy, explored Ireland in an interwar-European context.

In collaboration with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and Boston College, Professor McGarry leads a major UK Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project, A Global History of Irish Revolution 1916-1923. Underpinned by museum exhibitions and educational resources, this research includes special issues of Irish Historical Studies and History Ireland and a forthcoming publication by New York University Press. It is having a major scholarly and public impact as it places the Irish revolution within its transnational and global contexts. The project will culminate with an international conference held at Boston College in September 2021.

May
25
Tue
The Plight of the Uighurs in China @ Zoom
May 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us Tuesday, May 25 for “The Plight of the Uighurs in China”, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: Joshua Freeman, Princeton University

Topic: “The Plight of the Uighurs in China”

When: Tuesday, May 25, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required by guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About Joshua Freeman:

Joshua L. Freeman is a historian of twentieth-century China and Inner Asia. His research centers around official culture and nation formation in China’s northwestern borderlands, and in particular the cultural history of the transborder Uyghur nation. He received his Ph.D. in Inner Asian and Altaic Studies at Harvard University in 2019, where his research received support from the Social Science Research Council, Fulbright-IIE, and multiple centers at Harvard.

On the basis of his dissertation, he is currently at work on a book manuscript titled “Print Communism: Uyghur National Culture in Twentieth-Century China.” Drawing on cultural, literary, and political history, this study demonstrates that socialist policies, implemented in northwest China’s Xinjiang region from the 1930s through the late twentieth century, enabled the small Sino-Soviet frontier community of Ili to transform its local culture into the new Uyghur national culture. Examining this process offers insight into the nexus between socialism and nation formation at the intersection of the Chinese, Soviet, and Islamic worlds.

Freeman’s work as a cultural historian is informed and inspired by the seven years he spent living in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. In addition to working extensively there as a translator, he completed a master’s degree in Uyghur literature at Xinjiang Normal University with a thesis on Uyghur modernist poetry, which he composed and defended in Uyghur. He has translated (link is external) the work of a number of Uyghur poets into English and has published widely in American literary journals.

At Princeton, Freeman lectures on Chinese and Inner Asian history in the Department of East Asian Studies. In fall 2019, he is offering a survey of modern Chinese history, and in spring 2020 he will teach a course on everyday life in Mao’s China. Intended future courses include “China’s Others: Minority Peoples in the Chinese Past and Present.”

Jun
8
Tue
Prospects for a Russia-China Alliance: Moscow’s Calculus @ Zoom
Jun 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us for our June 8, 2021, presentation, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: David Abramson, Bureau of Research & Intelligence, US State Department

Topic: “Prospects for a Russia-China Alliance: Moscow’s Calculus”

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping have flirted with and talked around the prospect of a Sino-Russian alliance, but the truth is both sides are reluctant to commit to alliances in general because of the various restraints they impose on members. Uncertainties about future U.S. foreign policy and shifts in the world order heighten those uncertainties. Dr. David Abramson will discuss these issues from Moscow’s perspective and assess the chances that its increasingly warm and reciprocated public rhetoric about their “comprehensive strategic partnership of coordination” is leading towards a formal alliance.

When: Tuesday, June 8, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required for guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About David Abramson:

Dr. David Abramson is senior analyst covering Russia’s relations with Asia for the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research. He previously worked for many years as a Central Asia analyst, focusing primarily on domestic and regional politics and Islamic trends in Eurasia. During 2001-2005, Dr. Abramson spent four years in the Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom, monitoring and promoting religious freedom as an element of U.S. foreign policy, advising on outreach to the Muslim world, and engaging with Muslim-American communities.

Dr. Abramson has taught at Georgetown and George Washington universities and published on Islam, foreign assistance in Central Asia, and anthropologists working in national security. His most recent publication is a chapter on Islam and state policies in Uzbekistan in “Islam, Society, and Politics in Central Asia.”  Raised in Storrs, CT, he later earned his B.A. in Russian language and literature at Wesleyan University and his Ph.D. in cultural anthropology at Indiana University. He grew up in Storrs, CT.

Jun
16
Wed
The West and Russia Since the End of the Cold War @ Zoom
Jun 16 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us June 16 for “The West and Russia Since the End of the Cold War”, part of our 2020-2021 speaker series.

Presenter: Fiona Hill, Brookings Institution

Topic: “The West and Russia Since the End of the Cold War”

When: Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 6:00 p.m. – presentation followed by a Q&A with the speaker

Where: Virtually! We will be using Zoom meetings. Registration required by guests. The link to join us will be emailed with your registration confirmation.

Cost: Free for members (renew or join today!). $20 per presentation for guests.

About Fiona Hill:

Fiona Hill is the Robert Bosch senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. She recently served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council from 2017 to 2019. From 2006 to 2009, she served as national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at The National Intelligence Council. She is co-author of “Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin” (Brookings Institution Press, 2015).

Prior to joining Brookings, Hill was director of strategic planning at The Eurasia Foundation in Washington, D.C. From 1991 to 1999, she held a number of positions directing technical assistance and research projects at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, including associate director of the Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project, director of the Project on Ethnic Conflict in the Former Soviet Union, and coordinator of the Trilateral Study on Japanese-Russian-U.S. Relations.

Hill has researched and published extensively on issues related to Russia, the Caucasus, Central Asia, regional conflicts, energy, and strategic issues. Her book with Brookings Senior Fellow Clifford Gaddy,“The Siberian Curse: How Communist Planners Left Russia Out in the Cold,” was published by Brookings Institution Press in December 2003, and her monograph, “Energy Empire: Oil, Gas and Russia’s Revival,” was published by the London Foreign Policy Centre in 2004. The first edition of “Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin” was published by Brookings Institution Press in December 2013, also with Clifford Gaddy.

Hill holds a master’s in Soviet studies and a doctorate in history from Harvard University where she was a Frank Knox Fellow. She also holds a master’s in Russian and modern history from St. Andrews University in Scotland, and has pursued studies at Moscow’s Maurice Thorez Institute of Foreign Languages. Hill is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Featured

Peace Movement by Indigenous Women in India

When: March 23, 2021 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Where: Zoom

Join us in March for our Quarterly Colloquium presentation. Presenter: Binalakshmi Nepram, Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard Kennedy School; Writer, Civil Rights Activist; Founder, Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network, Control Arms[…]

Mission Statement

The mission of the Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) is to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs by study, debate, and educational programming, primarily through a Speakers Series of 8 to 10 monthly meetings.